Bike-in Movie Night

Bike-in Movie Night

Bike, walk, bus, run, skateboard, or even drive (if you must) to the MSU Bikes Service Center at Bessey Hall, on Saturday, September 13th, for MSU Sustainability’s first-ever Bike-In Movie Night. The movie chosen for this event is “The Clean Bin Project,” a story about two people who attempt a year of waste-free living. The movie will begin at 8PM sharp and will be projected onto the back exterior wall of the Bike Center. Guests are welcome to sit in the grass between the Bike Center and the Bessey Hall parking lot, and are encouraged to bring their own blankets or folding chairs.

Admission is free and open to the public, and starting at 7PM the Eat at State On-The-Go Green Food Truck will be on site for guests wishing to purchase concessions items. But remember that we are trying to make this a zero-waste event, so please bring any drinks or snacks in reusable or recyclable containers and dispose of any waste items in the recycling and compost containers provided during the event.

In case of rain or inclement weather, the event will be rescheduled for a later date. For more information regarding this event, call (517)355-1723 or email recycle@msu.edu.

 

 

Concessions Goes Greener

No, it’s not green popcorn or green ice cream, or even green eggs and ham. Concession’s manager Alan Wilkinson has taken the group’s sustainability efforts to new heights—and has become a national leader in the process.

Alan Wilkinson receiving his 2014 Be Spartan Green Award.

Alan Wilkinson receiving his 2014 Be Spartan Green Award.

It’s been a long time since Alan Wilkinson has seen a MSU football game – even though he’s been at Spartan Stadium for nearly every home game in the last 15 years.

“Yeah,” the MSU Concessions Manager laughs when asked about being a spectator. “I haven’t really been able to watch a game since I was in high school. But

even though I can’t see the field itself, I feel like I always know what’s going on in the stadium—you can just tell by the atmosphere of the event when the team is doing well. You can feel it in the air.”

Wilkinson and his Concessions team are old pros at reading the atmosphere at MSU events. The department, headed by Wilkinson and his management team of Justin Evans, Dale Nagele and Alex Terranova, provide food and beverage options to thousands (if not millions) of people during more than 400 events each year. That includes the big events like football and basketball, as well as smaller or less frequent events, such as the Muscular Dystrophy Walk, the MSU Car Show or Vet-A-Visit.

“No matter what the size of the event, we always want to be part of the fun,” said Wilkinson. “People come out to watch the team, see a show, or walk around the exhibition, but we want to make sure that Concessions is part of that fun time. We’re always looking for opportunities for Concessions to contribute, to make a difference.”

That attitude of making a difference extends beyond providing food and beverage options to hungry fans and participants during the event—for Wilkinson and his team, it also meant finding ways to make a difference before anyone shows up and long after they’ve gone home.

Sustainability Before, During and After
For many years prior to Wilkinson’s leadership, the concessions team had been donating leftover food items to Lansing’s Food Movers Program and recycling cardboard regularly. But as Michigan State’s sustainability efforts began to ramp up, Wilkinson knew Concessions had to be part of the solution as well. That meant taking a look at the entire life cycle of concessions products — from sourcing, product selection, preparation and disposal — and finding new and creative ways to lessen the impact on the environment and keep as much out of the landfills as possible.

Q&A with Concessions Manager Alan Wilkinson

What’s the most interesting thing Concessions has ever sent to the MSU Surplus store?
One year we had a really mild winter, and we didn’t sell as much hot chocolate as we normally would have, so we had a lot leftover.  We sent them a whole bunch of 3-pound bags of hot cocoa.  That’s a lot of cocoa for one person!

What’s the most challenging place you’ve ever needed to set up concessions?
Without a doubt, it was the Game of Change they had at Jenison in 2012.  It was essentially a full, modern-day basketball game held in a building without the permanent concession facilities.  We had a good time setting up pop-up stores throughout the building, but it was a challenge!

What was the most interesting event you’ve ever attended as part of MSU Concessions?
The U2 concert.  I didn’t get to see a bit of it, but we could still hear everything!

If you could have purchased one thing from the MSU Surplus Store, what would it have been?
I saw the Zamboni there one.  That was pretty cool!

“We’ve made a focused effort on offering regionally made food at MSU events, which cuts down on shipping waste and gives us a chance to showcase local food,” said Wilkinson. The group has also made a point of selling reusable cups and mugs at events – making them collector’s items in some cases.

Concessions has been recycling cardboard and plastic for decades, and uses all paper products – they no longer use any foam — and the group works very hard to get to zero waste in the back of the house. But the biggest impact came when they looked at ways to reduce food waste from products not eligible for donation.

Make the Garbage Can Really Small
When the anaerobic digester came online at Michigan State, Wilkinson and his group were some of the first to look for ways to contribute. An anaerobic digester is an oxygen-deprived, heated, sealed tank where organic waste decomposes quickly, producing methane for fuel, and MSU has the largest system on any college campus in the United States.

“We really wanted to get started on sending inedible food waste to the digester instead of just having to throw it away,” said Wilkinson. “I didn’t want to wait; I kept asking, and we realized that we could use bins that weren’t working for the residence halls.”

The containers that had originally been used at the residence halls for food waste were becoming problematic because the handles had an area that leaked – and with the variety of food waste coming from the dining areas, it was getting pretty messy. Concessions knew those same containers would work well for their purposes, since they usually deal with opened, pre-packaged dry items, such as pretzels, popcorn and buns.

“So we went from having one huge container in each concession stand that was overflowing with trash, we replaced it with three containers: a 55-gallon bin for plastics that goes to recycling, the 30-gallon for food waste that goes to the digester, and we made the garbage can really, really small.”

Those efforts have made a huge difference: the group currently send between 500 and 800 pounds of food waste per football game to the digester—food that would have gone to the landfill in the past.

Team Green
Wilkinson credits the sustainability success to the teamwork between all the groups on campus, particularly the service provided by the Recycling Center.

“They have been instrumental to making this work,” Wilkinson said.  “They send us 90-gallon gondolas where we can dump all the collected food waste, then they will take them to the digester, empty them, rinse it out and bring it back to us ready-to-use.  It’s been a fantastic team effort.”

Wilkinson is also particularly proud to be part of a department and campus so committed to sustainability.  “Nationally we are at the top of our game in terms of concessions food recycling- and that includes pro venues.  Honestly, I don’t know of any other university concessions program doing a food recycling program.  It’s great to be part of a university that can look for new ways to make a difference.  We want to be Spartan Green.”

By the numbers:

  • 22,000 Souvenir mugs sold last year
  • 17,000 Tons of organic waste utilized by MSU’s anaerobic digester last year
  • 15,000 Hot dogs prepared for each Football Saturday
  • 1,000 Prepared and unsold hot dogs donated per Football Saturday.
  • 500 Pounds of food waste sent to the anaerobic digester after each Football game.
  • 400 Events per year where Concessions are sold

Feed the Worms! Join the Compost Club.

Stop! Step away from the trash can with that apple core – those coffee grounds – that stash of used tissues. That’s worm food, and somewhere in south campus on the Student Organic Farm, there’s a hungry Red Wiggler worm (let’s call him Ralph), who’s longing for your organic waste. This summer, help feed worms like Ralph by joining MSU’s new Compost Club.

Sponsored by MSU Sustainability and the Student Organic Farm, the Compost Club will provide university employees with a landfill-alternative disposal option for their compostable organic waste (i.e. fruit scraps, paper napkins, tea bags, etc.). This means you, as the environmentally friendly, tree-hugging Spartan we know you are (even if it’s hidden deep inside), now have a chance to divert even more waste from your landfill containers.

Here’s how it works: For $20 a month (or less when purchasing at a multi-bin discounted rate), club participants will receive a 20 gallon collection bin, to be exchanged on a weekly basis via bike trailer (yes even our collection method is environmentally friendly). Once collected, the organic waste will be shred and delivered to the Student Organic Farm to undergo vermicomposting, a process in which worms (like Ralph) and other micro-organisms are utilized to turn organic waste into nutrient-rich fertilizer. Compost produced through this program will then be used for growing vegetables and herbs at the Student Organic Farm, and will also be sold to the public through the MSU Surplus Store. All proceeds generated through this program will go towards supporting MSU Bikes and the Student Organic Farm operations.

So if you think about it, by joining the Compost Club, not only will your waste help feed worms like Ralph, it will go towards returning nutrients to an entire ecosystem, all while feeding the local economy. To learn more about joining the Compost Club, contact MSU Recycling at recycle@msu.edu, or by calling 517-355-1723.

Feed the worms

Stay in Touch

Make a Service Request

Service Hotline: 517-355-1723
Fax: 517-353-9038
E-mail: recycle@msu.edu

Overflowing Bins in your Office?

Custodial Services: 517-355-8485
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